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Coders at Work: Reflections on the Craft of Programming [Peter Seibel] on hamhillfort.info Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App. Download at hamhillfort.info eBook versions and licenses are also available for most titles. For more information, reference our Special .. Finally, a note on the title: we chose Coders at Work for its resonance with the previously mentioned. 15 of the most interesting computer programmers alive today in Coders at Work , ebooks can be used on all reading devices; Immediate eBook download.


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As the words at work suggest, Peter Seibel focuses on how his interviewees tackle the Скачать эту книгу (k) в формате: fb2, lrf, epub, mobi, txt, html. Based on nearly eighty hours of conversations with fifteen all-time great programmers and computer scientists, the Q&A interviews in Coders at Work provide a. Oct 6, You can never have too many free ebooks—especially ones that help you go: 15 programming books for beginners and current coders alike.

It seems that you're in Ukraine. We have a dedicated site for Ukraine. Hundreds of people have suggested names of programmers to interview on the Coders at Work web site: The complete list was names. Peter Seibel is a serious developer of long standing. He participated in the Java revolution as an early employee at WebLogic which, after its acquisition by BEA, became the cornerstone of the latter's rapid growth in the J2EE sphere.

How did you learn to program?

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What is the role of documentation? What is the role of testing? What is the worst bug you have faced in your career?

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What is the best way to debug? What is the role of computer science courses, in particular assembly, in your career? What is the role of math in your career? How big were the teams in which you worked? What is your best achievement? Is your work science, engineering, or art?

How does your schedule affect your family and social life? Seibel also tailors questions for each interviewee, knowing well their biography and confronting them about milestones, contacting former professors and current friends, creating ties between different interviewees, etc. The book is very long, but this is because each interview tries to capture not only the answers, but also the essence of the interlocutor.

We get to appreciate the kindness and open spirit of Simon Peyton Jones, the non-nonsense attitude of Donald Knuth, the die-hard approach of Joe Armstrong, etc. I found this immensely appealing and well-worth the wordiness. A few of the lessons: All in all, an amazing book about computer scientists, and an absolute must read for anyone with aspirations for this industry.

Oct 12, Michael rated it really liked it. Four start with a big asterisk. Overall, this is a fascinating book that any programmer will enjoy. Seibel does a nice job asking questions that are particular to each person, but also trying to get a variety of opinions on the same questions that face all programmers. The problem with the book is the interview with Fran Allen. If you look up "women" in the index, you'll find about a dozen pages, all of them Four start with a big asterisk. If you look up "women" in the index, you'll find about a dozen pages, all of them in Allen's interview.

If gender equality is an important issue in computer science, Seibel should've treated it as such and asked more than just the one woman about it. If not, why is he wasting space on it? As it is, Seibel treats gender equality as an issue for women in engineering to solve, which is the worst possible attitude to have.

Dec 27, Dagmar rated it liked it. The book was requested by my year old son, who is a computer science major studying programming language, for his birthday. I browsed through it, found it interesting and ended up reading the whole thing. This book satisfied the geek in me. It was self-validating for me to read about others who are passionate about software development - its not something you read about often.

Quite a few of the people interviewed were actually quite a bit older than me - so it was interesting to read about t The book was requested by my year old son, who is a computer science major studying programming language, for his birthday.

Quite a few of the people interviewed were actually quite a bit older than me - so it was interesting to read about the evolution of the craft that I've seen come and go.

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It would have been interesting to include more and younger females in the book - only one was interviewed. Nov 08, Reza Mahmoudi added it. Mar 18, Simon Eskildsen rated it liked it. Terrific account of programming adventures and convictions by some of the disciplines stars. I found most of the other chapters fairly weak, hence the 3-star rating, despite the interviews with the ones named easily being stars. It's interesting how a few of them have somewhat quit the disciplines Terrific account of programming adventures and convictions by some of the disciplines stars.

It's interesting how a few of them have somewhat quit the disciplines and now live far away from computers. I can see the appeal in that, but, I can't really see myself doing it long-term, which many of them have done. The amount of commonalities in what they've each discovered is great. They alll describe it in slightly different ways, however: A phrase that Simon Peyton Jones used a lot I haven't been able to stop thinking about is: I can really appreciate that from all the code that's come back to bite me where I've said "this is solved now!

Nov 24, Mike rated it really liked it Shelves: I never read books on programming, or coding, or whatever. Maybe that's a personal flaw.

It's been my job for my entire adult life, and a little bit before that.

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But I grabbed this book after seeing an image of the cover, and I ended up devouring it. The book is a set of interviews with some of the supermen of programming. Sometimes very, very technical. Sometimes funny. Sometimes I felt like an idiot these people are incredibly, incredibly good but it also reminded me of the reasons I got into I never read books on programming, or coding, or whatever. Sometimes I felt like an idiot these people are incredibly, incredibly good but it also reminded me of the reasons I got into programming in the first place, as a kid, and later on, and it's good to know a lot of the modern developments in the industry that I hate, a lot of these old guys do too.

Don't go looking for this to be a practical how-to. I wouldn't suggest it to anyone who hasn't been programming for years already, but I did recommend it immediately to a couple of old friends.

It's such a breath of fresh air compared to an endless parade of frameworks and Ruby and Patterns and whatever other vomit-inducing bullshit is the latest development fad.

These guys were there, doing the heavy lifting, when computers filled entire rooms, all the way through to now where a sizeable chunk of the interviewees work at Google. It broadens your perspective, not only to see where we started, but some really interesting ways forward.

And yeah, some of these guys are legitimate fossils. Source control? It's still worth it. Nov 29, Amar Pai rated it liked it. I enjoyed this, but it's something you're only going to care about if you're a programmer by trade. Feb 17, Jo Oehrlein marked it as on-hold Shelves: Favorite quotes: But that's not the point--you're not here to write code; you're here to ship products.

A lot of people are skittish about that. And that doesn't help anybody. Not knowing something doesn't mean you're dumb--it just means you don't know it yet. It's more important than being fast, almost as important as being correct, but I think being readable is actually the most likely way of making it correct. If it was stuff that had been done before we'd be reusing something else.

For most of what we do, we're doing something that we haven't done before. And doing things that you haven't done before is hard. It's a lot of fun, but it's difficult. And we have to be because if we weren't optimists we couldn't do this work. Which is why we fall prey to things like second systems, why we can't schedule our projects, why this stuff is hard. And then when you have a design moer firm you'll stick with it and you'll start patching it more, and you'll get to this mature state where we creak with patches.

It's kind of an evolutionary dead-end for code. In some ways the code should speak for itself at the small level. It's at the bigger level, the big monster function or the module boundary, that you need docs. There are people who would like to pretend that this isn't so, that engineers are interchangeable, and that everyone can and should be a total generalist. But this ignores the fact that there are people who are stunningly good at certain things and not necessarily so good at other things.

If you force them all to do everything, you'll probably make mediocre products. But merely the fact that they're the smartest people in the organization doesn't mean they should be making all the decisions, because intelligence is not a scalar quantity; it's a vector quantity.

To mentally think, this black box is so impenetrable and so difficult that I won't open it I can't say beginner programmers should open up all these abstractions. But what I am saying is you should certainly consider the possibility of opening them. Not completely reject the idea.

Coders at Work: Reflections on the Craft of Programming

It's worthwhile seeing if the direct route is quicker than the packaged route. So I try to make my programs as beautiful as I can but not necessarily as general as I can. There's a difference. I try to write code that will do the task at hand in a way that's as clear and perspicuous as I can make it. Why would you ever want not to do it? Jul 14, Sai rated it really liked it Shelves: I am pretty glad I ended up reading this book.

This book is structured as a set of interviews of veteran software developers; some well known: The interview asked a similar set of questions to all the people covered in the book, that covered topics such as: The breadth of folks covered was pretty valuable. Almost each of the interviewees had something unique to offer in terms of sharing their experience or offering up an insight about their work that they had learned over multiple decades in the profession. Oct 16, Ben Haley rated it really liked it.

Coders at work transcribes 16 some odd interviews of both new and old school programming giants culminating with Donald Knuth. For me it was the right book at the right time.

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After a year of studying algorithms, languages, and hardware, it was good to hear the voices of experience detailing the struggles of their day-to-days. In some cases their lessons reassured me that I hadn't missed some magic programming spells, in others I felt grossly outmatched by their experience and casual referencing Coders at work transcribes 16 some odd interviews of both new and old school programming giants culminating with Donald Knuth.

In some cases their lessons reassured me that I hadn't missed some magic programming spells, in others I felt grossly outmatched by their experience and casual referencing of computers, languages, and tools that were totally unknown to me.

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Besides the well-appreciated name drops, the central message of this book was really quite simple: Joe Armstrong Seibel, Peter Seiten Peter Norvig Seibel, Peter Seiten Guy Steele Seibel, Peter Seiten Dan Ingalls Seibel, Peter Seiten Ken Thompson Seibel, Peter Seiten Fran Allen Seibel, Peter Seiten Bernie Cosell Seibel, Peter Seiten Donald Knuth Seibel, Peter Seiten Dieses Buch auf SpringerLink lesen.

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