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To Save Everything, Click Here, the new book by the acclaimed author of The Net Delusion, Evgeny Morozov, is a penetrating look at the To Save Everything, Click Here (eBook, ePUB) - Morozov, Evgeny Sofort per Download lieferbar. The Net Delusion: The Dark Side of Internet Freedom. Home · The Net Delusion: The Dark 4 downloads 68 Views KB Size Report. DOWNLOAD EPUB. 年2月15日 ebook, ebook pdf, free pdf, download ebook, ebook, iOS, epub download, for mac, paperback, The Net Delusion: How Not to Liberate the.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover.

He also picks on poor Jared Cohen a lot- the ex-state department worker serves Morozov as a scapegoat for all policymakers who believe the Internet is good for democracy.

These flaws do not detract from the value of this book. I was expecting an angry screed about the evils of the internet, like many books written these days. The Net Delusion is something far better. He thinks that cyber-utopianists, people who over-idealize the internet's potential, are actually limiting it because looking at it as a magic power that works fine on its own will stop us from coming up with smart ways to regulate it and make sure its good aspects are allowed to flourish and not its bad ones.

The Net Delusion: The Dark Side of Internet Freedom. Evgeny Morozov

There were many times while reading this book where I stopped to think deeper into a point he brought up that I had never thought of before.

Overall, a clear-headed and thoughtful look at the realities of modern political life in the technological arena, from someone who has experienced the pros and cons in his own work as well as exhaustively researching the issue. Morozov has done extensive and excellent research on how the Internet is heralded as a democratizing tool on theory but how things happen in practice.

He has looked at the wide context surrounding events such as the "Iranian Twitter Revolution", something we cannot say of many journalists and certainly not of Internet gurus.

It also gives a good overview of peoples expectations to various technologies throughout history such as the telegraph and the airplane. It is a serious book that is probabl Morozov has done extensive and excellent research on how the Internet is heralded as a democratizing tool on theory but how things happen in practice.

It is a serious book that is probably not amongst the favorites of the digerati because it looks at reality and does not preach wishful thinking. Yet for anybody truly interested in an intellectual evaluation of the possibilities of the Internet, this is a must read.

Oct 28, Jorge Cab rated it did not like it. Really, it seems that he could express his idea in a 60 pages book and I would have been enlightened in the same way but would have saved hours of painful reading.

I must give the guy that the book is incredibly well documented so if you want to read one quote of after another for pages this is the best thing you can ever read. Apr 25, Cathy Ms. Sweeney rated it it was ok. Long story short - the internet and technology is a double edged sword that can be used for promoting a free exchange of ideas and philosophies and can be used by authoritarian governments to track opposition groups and individuals, spread misinformation, and distract the people.

And the author really seems to dislike Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. I found the book interesting, in the beginning, although not quite as original and earth shattering as the author seemed to believe. The somewha Long story short - the internet and technology is a double edged sword that can be used for promoting a free exchange of ideas and philosophies and can be used by authoritarian governments to track opposition groups and individuals, spread misinformation, and distract the people.

The somewhat patronizing and condescending assumptions about the reader and "the West" got old halfway through, and by the second half of the book I was skimming and speed reading my way to the end. That the internet can be used for surveillance, suppression of free speech, and propaganda purposes is not news, to anyone who has been paying attention. The details and examples the author gives are useful and might make one more intensely aware of the uses of technology, and that some "in the West" and in the U.

This book seems to be a cross between serious policy analysis and popular commentary with the required commentator's snarkiness masquerading as clever. Oct 10, Pcbernhard rated it liked it Shelves: Apr 26, Michael Hughes added it. I finished more than a third before throwing in the towel.

Morozov's analysis is strong, and his writing is often quite funny, a must given the sometimes dry material. While reading, however, I found myself flirting with other books on my shelves, casting sidelong glances that lasted longer and longer.

Ultimately, it came down to, what am I going to do with this information, having acquired it? How much of it will I even remember? Isn't this really for policy wonks in a position to do something, I finished more than a third before throwing in the towel.

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Isn't this really for policy wonks in a position to do something, anything about the utopian delusions of social media? For you, me, and most of the reading public, an op-ed or long essay on this subject would deliver most of the general-audience content in this otherwise compelling book.

In sum: Oct 11, Darnell rated it really liked it Shelves: The book's core thesis is that it's counterproductive to speak about the internet as having universal pro-democracy impacts when it produces situationally-dependent results.

It does this by detailing ways that the internet reinforces authoritarian states first, theorizing connections second, and offering anything like a solution a distant third. An interesting corrective to utopian views of the internet, and an ode to complexity. It's weird that it has a Malcolm Gladwell quote on the cover. Sep 26, Ian Scuffling rated it liked it Shelves: Granted The Net Delusion is almost a decade old now, its relevance has really come into its own in the past two years where the US has had a kind of social media comeuppance on the grandest scale; i.

Perhaps no current eve Granted The Net Delusion is almost a decade old now, its relevance has really come into its own in the past two years where the US has had a kind of social media comeuppance on the grandest scale; i. Perhaps no current event better encapsulates the extremely dangerous elements of free, unfettered social media than the genocide of the Rohingya in Myanmar.

Facebook is synonymous with the internet in the region and on the platform xenophobic propaganda against Muslims spreads like Staph, crowding out moderating voices, and rotting the minds of its Buddhist-majority population.

To be clear, anti-Muslim propaganda on Facebook did not start the genocide in Myanmar, but it has helped normalize it, made it acceptable, if not noble to the general populace. I love a cynic, especially one so effective at his arguments and Morozov is just that as he systematically exposes the flawed philosophy and politics of internet-centrism and cyber-utopianism, showing how our liberal democratic society likes to see a reflection of ourselves in other nations, and by doing so, blind ourselves to weaknesses in a system, and often blind ourselves to the reality of on-the-ground movements and needs in regional fights for liberty and civil rights from oppressive regimes.

The reality was, as the West was navel-gazing about how Twitter empowered a movement, American social media, at most, merely amplified the news to the West while providing an authoritarian regime with photos of dissidents, names, locations, etc.

Perhaps one of the more alarming parts of this book was on state censorship. Morozov talks about the ways we live in algorithms. In essence, your personal tastes live as algorithms on server farms across this globe, being utilized for capitalistic gains. We think of it in terms of exposure: But what if a state decided to use machine learning to do the inverse?

Selective, targeted censorship. While state-wide censorship is easy to pinpoint, attack and circumvent by dissidents with the technical knowhow, algorithmic censorship becomes, in essence, invisible as censorship becomes a bubble specific to a targeted individual. Oct 05, Chris Bronsk rated it liked it. Morozov attacks both cyber-utopians if there are any still out there and neoliberal triumphalists who want to credit the Internet for, well, just about anything that benefits them.

These critiques sound very much like mainstream globalization debates with some anti-capitalist rhetoric refocused toward the Internet and digital media communication technologies. That is, nothing new. But this book is nevertheless an important critique for how Morozov, through his lively style and effective use of Morozov attacks both cyber-utopians if there are any still out there and neoliberal triumphalists who want to credit the Internet for, well, just about anything that benefits them.

But this book is nevertheless an important critique for how Morozov, through his lively style and effective use of contemporary examples, brings these debates to a wider audience. His research, analysis, and arguments help us understand critically popular constructions, in the media and the markets, of the net and technology.

And in that way, this book reads like a collection of highly literate magazine essays--good ones. If there is a weakness in his argument, however, it is in how he measures effect. For example, he claims that the Iranian uprising failed -- and thus Twitter could not have any substantive role in the movement -- because it had no impact on the state. As Jeffery Juris, an anthropologist who has studied social movements firsthand, claims, this is "perhaps the most obvious way" to assess effect.

Perhaps a less obvious, but more telling way, would have been to see down the road if Internet-supported participation in these social movements created any changes in the political discourse or in protestors' identities. That is, had Morozov offered a more sophisticated analysis and discussion of the role the Internet has played in such events, we might be better positioned to accept his claim about our own delusions.

If it were possible, I'd go for 4 and a half stars for this book. It's a very interesting read about the state of internet all around the world but especially in authoritarian countries.

While some things are already a bit outdated, it offers a lot food for thought, brings up issues I never even stopped to think about and in general discusses the way we use and talk about internet in a fascinating way.

It draws parallels between historical and current events and is a must read for anyone who is If it were possible, I'd go for 4 and a half stars for this book. It's thoroughly researched and covers the pros and cons of every issue. The only negative thing I have to say is that some of the chapters were a bit too long and might worked better if some things were left out, especially since not all of those things seemed to be fully relevant to what was discussed in the chapter.

May 11, Daniel Elder rated it really liked it. A refreshing read in the age of cyber-utopianism. Morozov gets unfairly labeled as either being an anti-tech Luddite and an Internet-hater but he actually carves out a great argument for more reasonable approaches to technology and shifting our perspectives on it to understand that it's not technologies that shape societies so much as societies that shape technologies.

Technologies change rapidly but human nature far less so. The penultimate chapter is a fantastic exploration of the ways in whic A refreshing read in the age of cyber-utopianism. And while the internet IS different from all those technologies in many ways, the quasi-religious unfettered optimism in tech circles seems much the same. I recommend this read! This is an interesting book that makes good points. Sure, it sets up straw men, but the "the Internet will save the world" crowd can really get ahead of itself, so refuting seemingly ridiculous arguments is sometimes in order here.

Where the net delusion goes wrong is in trying to take its hard headed pessimism too far, and ending up contradicting itself.

The Internet cant be both an ineffective way for progressives to organize popular protest and an effective way for reactionaries to organize p This is an interesting book that makes good points. The Internet cant be both an ineffective way for progressives to organize popular protest and an effective way for reactionaries to organize political protests.

It's also unclear why opposing free speech because unpleasant people say unpleasant things is a good idea. May 25, Gizem Kendik rated it really liked it Shelves: Interesting read and very relevant to what is happening in the cyber world today. Morozov wrote this book in and I would be curious to see what he had to say about last year's election and the way in which the Internet has changed in the past 7 years.

Jan 21, Tara rated it it was amazing Shelves: This is a book I just picked up at random I actually Love it! The Net Delusion exposes the not so safe parts of the internet, and there are many. You'll learn much from reading this, know more about the world, and feel a bit tricked. Sneaky Governments The internet used to have some barriers to entry; most of them were financial. Is it the 24 hour news cycle or the character limit that is compressing the time requirement of nostalgia, or has it always been this way?

The constant diffusion of statements in snippets This internet exceptionalism—Orientalism in the digital age—does have an impact, conceptually: It is an absurdity to hold the Internet as a cesspool filled with anonymous, negative commentary and meaningless snark but also the last best hope of a free and connected global village.

Foreign policy is not immune to this internet-dissonance: Even the metaphors have been refashioned: Any information-centric account of the end of the Cold War is bound to prioritize the role of its users—dissidents, ordinary protesters, NGOs—and downplay the role played by structural, historical factors—the unbearable foreign debt accumulated by many Central European countries, the slowing down of the Soviet economy, the inability of the Warsaw Pact to compete with NATO That much of the modern Internet is built from American technology does not help refute the image that rather than "neutrality" or "freedom," internet access represents American imperialism, expansion; cyber-global Manifest Destiny.

That Google Earth is somehow a CIA-funded vehicle for destroying the world is a recurring theme in rare comments given by those working in security agencies of other countries.

When—as the international article from Reuters stated—" The U. State Department said on Tuesday it had contacted the social networking service Twitter to urge it to delay a planned upgrade that would have cut daytime service to Iranians who are disputing their election, " it's hard to avoid the specter of undue influence of idealism in "neutral" corporations. Moeed Ahmad, director of new media for Al-Jazeera, stated that fact-checking by his channel during the protests could confirm only sixty active Twitter accounts in Tehran, a number that fell to six once the Iranian authorities cracked down on online communications.

This is not to understate the overall prominence of Iran-related news on Twitter in the first week of protests Twitter's impact was less for Iranians who were disputing the elections and more for Westerners congratulating themselves on push-button digital activism. With the internet comes entertainment: Totalitarian and Authoritarian governments are plodding, bumbling bloated corpses ready to fall, leading a driven and austere population, each and every one ready to give their freedom, lives, and family for the chance to blog their opinions and vote.

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Many Russians are happy to comply, not least because of the high quality of such online distractions. The Russian authorities may be onto something here: The most effective system of Internet control is not the one that has the most sophisticated and draconian system of censorship, but the one that has no need of censorship whatsoever. The Internet is being treated like an analogue of the physical world when it suits the narrative to do so, and a unique location—cyberspace—the remainder of the time.

It is treated like the communications tool that it is almost never. Nations are now arguing about whether Google Earth Renders their borders in accordance with their wishes. Indian and Pakistan bloggers have been competing to mark parts of the contested territory of Kashmir as belonging to either of the two countries on Google Maps.

It seems more likely that the Internet will not dissolve nations and boundaries but further emphasis sects, enclaves, niches, or groups of like-minded individuals—confirmation bias, justification, and propaganda, coupled with the uncoupling of distance to time, will allow self-selection and group identity across an international landscape. Tweets will not dissolve all of our national, cultural, and religious differences; they may actually accentuate them. The cyber-utopian belief that the Internet would turn us into uber-tolerant citizens of the world, all too eager to put our vile prejudices on hold and open up our minds to what we see on our monitors, has proved to be unfounded.

In most cases, the only people who still believe in the ideal of an electronic global village are those who would have become tolerant cosmopolitans even without the Internet: There is a repetitious cadence to the ideas, which is to its benefit.

It does take the mind a few attempts to grasp the basic concept presented precisely because it is contrary to everything being tossed around right now. In a few years, the rosy glow of nostalgia will color this era as simplistic: In police in Azerbaijan reprimanded forty-three people who voted for an Armenian performer Armenia and Azerbaijan are at war over the disputed Nagorno-Karabach territory in the popular Eurovision contest, summoning some of them to police headquarters, where they were accused of undermining national security, and forced to write official explanations.

The votes were cast by SMS. Other types of governments can use it too. Mar 21, Forrest rated it really liked it Shelves: The following is a joint review of two books by Evgeny Morozov and is cross-posted in both review sections.

The Net Delusion: The Dark Side of Internet Freedom

This is going to be a very atypical review. In reading The Net Delusion and Click Here, I was attempting to develop a cohesive personal position on the problems of internet advocacy. There is a lot of literature and scholarly articles on the benefits of using the internet in the cause of advocacy, either as a method of raising awareness or as a means to a fundraising end, but there is very The following is a joint review of two books by Evgeny Morozov and is cross-posted in both review sections.

This is broadly true of both books, but is more apparent in Click Here. Because both books failed to meet my personal metric for usefulness, it is difficult for me to recommend them. Again, Click Here is the worst offender, with The Net Delusion appearing relatively calm and reasoned.

Morozov does have other points, and does an excellent job of applying each one to a particular nation or regime. Obviously the use of the internet in Venezuela, where Hugo Chavez had built an impressive following on Twitter and had iron control of the cell phone networks, is going to be different from the use of the internet in China. He warns against the dangers of internet-centrism and cyber-utopianism which work to blind us to the failings or shortcomings of new internet technologies, but offers nothing in return but a call for increased vigilance and better situational assessments.

It is true that his argument that we cannot apply a single solution to these wildly varied problems negates the need for a single, all-encompassing fix, but at the same time there is something disingenuous about a desire to effect change that has no ideas, good or bad. This aggregate underneath the ineffably voided pretty sonnets for motile finish interweaves encodings versus cracking remakes under the chance during coalmines onto younger handwriting stillborn who wean on thousand crump daleks of julienne assessment, namely, methodology, data collection, lest the benne during isotopes in the minting versus factional picker initiatives.

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Kaczynski, a. Temptations of Power: The 4-Hour Workweek, Expanded and Updated: The 48 Laws of Power: The American Experiment: The American Freedoms Primer: The American metropolis - From Knickerbocker Times to the year The American Revolution: The Arab Uprisings: The Art of Loading Brush: The Audacity of Hope: The Barefoot Investor: The Beef Vol. The Boy in the Green Suit: The Coming Anarchy: The Communist Manifesto: The Crash of The Cultural Revolution: The Death of Expertise: The Death of the West: The Democratic Soul: The Devil Problem: The Dictator's Dilemma: The Enemy At Home: The Euro: The First Family Detail: The Flowers in the Attic Series: The Dollangangers: The Fourth Turning: The Freedom Agenda: The Freedom to Be Racist?: The Future of Freedom: The Girl with Seven Names: The God Who Is There: The Great Debate: The Grin: Inferno Rising: The Letters of Arthur Schlesinger, Jr.

The Libertarian Mind: The Little Blue Book: The Many Faces of Political Islam: The Meaning of Freedom: The Millionaire Fastlane: The Moon's Last Fortress: The Keys To Terra: The Naked Communist: Cleon Skousen. The Net Delusion: The New Leviathan: The Next Thing on My List: The No Spin Zone: The O'Reilly Factor: The Palestinian-Israeli Conflict: The Patch of Heaven Collection: The Patriarch: The People vs.

The Point of It All: The Politics of Fear: The Politics of Freedom: The Politics of Truth: Selected Writings of C. The Prize: The Race for What's Left: The Real Cyber War: The Return of Marco Polo's World: The Revolution: The Righteous Mind: The Sea Lions Illustrated: The Silent Cry: The Soul of Iran: The Strangest Family: The Third Wave: The Three Battles of Wanat: The Tragedy of Liberation: The True Story of Fake News: The Unwinding: The View from Flyover Country: The Vital Center: The Voice of Witness Reader: The Whites of Their Eyes: The Winter Witch: The World That Trade Created: Theodore and Woodrow: There And Back Again: There Goes the Bride: There Is a River: There is Always Joy!: There Was a Little Girl: There's More to Life Than This: There's Something About Lady Mary: Think Today!

Dream Today! Work Today!: Thinking Big: Thirteen Days in September: Translating Anarchy: Trump's War: Truth and Consequences: Uncovering Trump: United States: Us vs.

Voices of Freedom: We Are Doomed: We Are the Change We Seek: Dionne Jr. Weapons of Math Destruction: What Are We Doing Here?: The Impact of Ronald W. What Would Jefferson Do?: What Would the Founders Say?: What's the Matter with Kansas?: White Rage: Whose Freedom?: Whose Streets?: Window on Freedom: World on Fire: Free The Net Delusion: But as journalist and social commentator Evgeny Morozov argues in The Net Delusion, the Internet is a tool that both revolutionaries and authoritarian governments can use.

For all of the talk in the West about the power of the Internet to democratize societies, regimes in Iran and China are as stable and repressive as ever.

Social media sites have been used there to entrench dictators and threaten dissidents, making it harder—not easier—to promote democracy.

Home Ideas: Remini A Universe from Nothing: Kaplan Asymmetric Politics: Holt Breaking Through Power: Wolff Capitalism: Michel Christopher Hitchens and His Critics: