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Jan 27, Posted in Uncategorized and tagged download, ebook, hindu, The . Dongri To Dubai: Six Decades of The Mumbai Mafia by S Hussain Zaidi. Aug 28, DONGRI TO DUBAI written by hamhillfort.infoN ZAIDI is a non-fictional book portraying the CLICK THIS LINK TO DOWNLOAD THE COMPLETE ebook Aditya Manjrekar if u need .epub),pdf file or review of any sort of book plz. Where can I download a free ebook of" Dongri Se Dubai Tak" (a Hindi dongri to dubai or read dongri to dubai online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format.

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This particular edition of the book is a reprint. Dongri To Dubai: Filled with facts, unknown incidents, and interesting stories, this book is a must-read.

The main part of the book revolves around Dawood Ibrahim and describes his story starting from a young age as a boy in Mumbai to the international terrorist he has become today. This book traces the journey of a boy from Dongri to Dubai. Dawood Ibrahim Kaskar was born in to a policeman. The police used to use him against various Pathan gangsters. Zaidi analyses that this alliance was born out of necessity. Pakistan is said to shelter him though he is one of the most wanted people on this planet, and in return he funds Islamic jihads.

The personality and characteristics of Dawood Ibrahim have been covered well in this book. His lust for power, his focus, his shrewdness, and his calculating mind have been captured beautifully. Meticulously researched, this book also has intelligent analysis along with the facts. The new movie, Shootout At Wadala, is based on this book. Hussain Zaidi is an Indian crime reporter and author.

Zaidi was born to a tailor, and grew up in the Mumbai suburb of Vikhroli. He has been working as a journalist and covering the Mumbai mafia for twenty years. This author also conducted the last ever published interview of Dawood Ibrahim.

He is married to crime reporter Velly Thevar, and they live in Mumbai. The book talks about how the Asura community is more liberal than the orthodox Deva clan, which was highly biased.

It also attacks the evil practices of the Brahmin caste. From the tale of Mah. Was he evil for deciding to lead life in his own terms? Was he wrong for freeing the people from the caste-cased Deva reign? The author takes the readers on an enthralling journey and poses many such complex questions. Bhadra is a creative character who gives voice to the common man, who is lost amidst the villains and heroes.

The author has been appreciated for his eye for detail, which gives life to his work. The right blend of good language and interesting twists keeps the book engaging. Anand Neelakantan is a talented narrator from India. He has a few satirical short stories to his credit. He is married to Aparna, and has two children, Abhinav and Ananya. Besides writing, Anand enjoys oil painting, reading, and drawing cartoons.

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Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. Sort order. Jul 17, Siddharth Sharma rated it liked it. I have always been pretty eager to read about the Mumbai Underworld, and S Hussain Zaidi has somehow helped me alot in quenching my thirst about the mumabi mafia through his earlier books Black Friday and The Mafia Queens of Mumbai.

I picked up 'Dongri to Dubai' with lots of hope,thinking that it is going to be a great sequel to the Mumbai Mafia trilogy,sadly, the I found the book below my expectation levels and here are the reasons for that: The book is repetitive at quite a number of instan I have always been pretty eager to read about the Mumbai Underworld, and S Hussain Zaidi has somehow helped me alot in quenching my thirst about the mumabi mafia through his earlier books Black Friday and The Mafia Queens of Mumbai.

The book is repetitive at quite a number of instances. Same paragraphs are repeated more than once. It feels quite irritating if you have to read the same paragraph which has appeared two pages earlier.

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Some of the anecdotes used in this book are already mentioned in 'The Mafia Queens of Mumbai'. Someone who has read that book wouuld very easily find this out. Most importantly, I found that Mr. Zaidi has tried pretty hard to portray Dawood Ibrahim as a larger than life character. Glorification of crime can be disastrous in the long term and the gullible youth can find an inspiration to venture into the wrong path after reading such unnecessary portrayals of someone who is a dreaded criminal.

Zaidi has tried to portray Dawood as a "Muslim" don by dividng the mumbai mafia on communal lines. Reading the book, I felt that Mr. Zaidi is trying to convey that "Muslim" Mafia is far better organized, eqipped and efficient than the Hindu Mafia. For me, crime and criminals have no religion, so such divisions along communal lines are uncalled for.

I am eagerly awaiting the fourth book of Mr. Zaidi i. Regards, Siddahrth View 1 comment. Jun 21, Ranjan rated it it was amazing Shelves: A book like this was long over due. It is a veritable encyclopedia on the Bombay underworld written by the best amongst the lot - Mr. Along with Shantaram and Maximum City, this book attempts to define a bewildering megalopolis that defies any easy classification Meticulously researched over a period of six years,it draws, for the first time, not only the careers of the most dreaded gangsters like Dawood and A book like this was long over due.

Meticulously researched over a period of six years,it draws, for the first time, not only the careers of the most dreaded gangsters like Dawood and Karim Lala and Haji Mastan and their contemporaries and predecessors , but also delves into their personal lives that range from their love affairs to their innermost flaws and fears.

The book rises above regular reportage and attains a maturity that is rarely seen amongst others of the ilk. View all 6 comments. Apr 10, Lit Bug rated it liked it Shelves: This was my first read about mafia - and while I was deeply interested in how Mumbai gave the mafia a chance to flourish, I also noticed asking myself a crucial question more frequently during the latter half of my read.

What should a nonfiction on mafia ideally convey? Or should it be a critical venture where, by exposing the murky machine This was my first read about mafia - and while I was deeply interested in how Mumbai gave the mafia a chance to flourish, I also noticed asking myself a crucial question more frequently during the latter half of my read.

Or should it be a critical venture where, by exposing the murky machinery of the underworld, the effects of criminal activities on society should also be commented upon, along with an enquiry into the aspects which drew people to crime? Reflecting on the exciting, information-laden, action-packed narrative I have just read, I find myself rooting for the latter. A crime nonfiction, especially one of this scale, ought not to be solely about chronology; rather, it should be a social inquiry into the nature of crime and criminals, along with the socio-economic and political machinations that allow crime to thrive.

My experience with this book has been a heady one — for one, I had only a vague idea about the six decades of mafia in Mumbai, mostly through popular consensus, some current affairs and a spate of unreliable Bollywood references on various forgotten gangsters. I took up this book to see if I could link these all into a coherent view of the history of mafia. Some of the most commonly known and feared gangsters, such as Haji Mastan, Varadarajan, Dawood, Abu Salem, Chhota Rajan, Chhota Shakeel and Manya Surve — some of them have become legendary names, while some of them have had their three-hours of fame in celluloid.

Most of them have been entirely forgotten. The account is extremely interesting — it explores how economic policies and political scenarios unwittingly opened up avenues for gangs to flourish. Although it comprehensively covers all major gangsters, it is more Dawood-centric, and it mostly follows a chronological account of only that gang which Dawood was to first join and then take over later.

Since the cover explicitly depicts only Dawood, it is to be expected that all roads lead to D Company. For beginners who have no idea about the details of the six decades of mafia, it is a lovely book — chronicling the rise of mafia, their operations, the involvement of police at various stages, apart from the usual politician-lobbying.

The latter part of the book concentrates more on Dawood and his changing fortunes — and the fortunes of the people around him — Chhota Rajan, Chhota Shakeel, Abu Salem — as also the state of Bollywood when it got unwillingly embroiled with D Company. A little more light is shed on how the Liberation policy of which liberalized the economy showered riches on the mafia, how communal riots, the Babri Mosque demolition resulted into the 10 serial bomb blasts in Mumbai in But 0 stars for everything else.

What I cringe at is the tone of the text. Every single paragaraph reeks of that uninhibited admiration for gangsters. Maybe Zaidi is afraid of Dawood — because he fleetingly mentions every bold journalist being murdered by them. It is a sort of glamorized, smooth, glib, charming, honeyed romantic account.

Instead of portraying the blood, filth and dirt that mafia really is, it is a sentimental account, which is a gross, inhuman injustice to the brave people who lost their lives to these ruffians. Wow, try telling me a notorious don had no idea what he was providing the logistics support for! I feel neither sympathy for them, nor pity. I only find myself singeing in fury and helplessness.

These people were criminals, not bloody victims. I give a full ZERO star for the intentions of the book.

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View all 12 comments. Mar 21, Salil Kanitkar rated it liked it Shelves: In my opinion, the second option is better - but there is absolutely nothing wrong in going with the first.

What a Non-fiction book about Mafia should Not do is glorification of the criminals, the romanticization of the power that life of crime brings and to Not cater to the morbid fascination of violence, gang-war, police shootings etc. And doing exactly that, I believe, is inexcusable! It is because of this, in my opinion, that Dongri to Dubai by S. Hussain Zaidi fails miserably. It is a dizzyingly fast paced thriller-ride that chronicles the Mumbai mafia starting right from - immediately after the Indian Independence - upto His rise from a poor family with 11 siblings and a respectable cop father to a street thug - then to a Police pawn - and finally to the numero uno of Mumbai underworld.

You feel livid after learning about the rampant corruption in Maharashtra politicians, in country-wide politicians in fact, the many opportunities to nab Dawood gone wasted.

One of the most infuriating story in the book is that during a gang-war related shootout by Dawood's men in Mumbai's JJ Hospital, they literally used a politician's "laal-batti" ambassador to escape! However, even an iota of glorification of crime, even a subtle hint, in a purely non-fictional book is not good.

Dongri to Dubai actually goes one step further. No sane person would buy this reasoning. The book mentions in gory details all the gang-war related shootouts - but the innocent people who lost their lives in the process deserve no more than a mere mention. Anyway, I am giving the book three stars. But a big thumbs down for the wrong overall tone of the book.

View all 4 comments. Jun 20, Nazrul Islam rated it it was amazing Shelves: Sep 21, Kali Srikanth rated it really liked it Shelves: Power n.: Ability to cause or prevent an action, make things happen ; the discretion to act or not act. Opposite of disability.

A Society is made up of people from various cultures, creeds, colors and walks of life. Within societies are poor, middle class, and very prosperous individuals and families. Society has its own government, rules to abide by, laws to follow, courts and other controlling factors to make people who live therein, safe.

People have careers, jobs, schools, commercial and resi Power n.: People have careers, jobs, schools, commercial and residential areas that facilitate this whole idea of society.

Mumbai then Bombay is one such cosmopolitan society which happily invites all "types" of people and offers every one of them who had conviction, to make fortune for them self.

City of dreams. But, there are certain individuals or group of individuals who stayed above all of this, meaning rules ungoverned, laws broken, fear instilled and chaos created which is, literally dictating this very society to kneel on all fours before them. And how did they manage to do it? Which may ever be the reason for their entry into this one way game, these men started, rose and finally, they doomed.

And this is the book which profoundly discusses about these men who controlled, manipulated, influenced, exploited or even to a certain extent balanced , the very word and the world of Power. Soon information just rolls page after page shifting from one place to other, from one influential person to another in Mumbai shaping the 60 years of Mafia.

People came, people ruled, people died, the end. I don't know but clearly which he alone possessed and his adversaries lacked. Yes, May be he is the kingpin of the whole game but I remind you he is on the other side of the law.

Apart from this, book has its own inadequacies, especially towards the ending. And there are places it gets too dramatic where Author desperately tries to prove that he managed to meet childhood associates of Dawood and churn exclusive info which he called "scenes" in acknowledgements section like his movements, talking style, smoking habits etc.

A complete picture. If you have same thoughts like I do, pick this book. View 2 comments. Oct 02, Arun Divakar rated it liked it. There is a morbid fascination we associate with the darker shades of the society who are referred to as the 'underworld'.

Seeing things from such an angle has also helped me understand the immense popularity movies like The Godfather trilogy, Scarface and Goodfellas have enjoyed. While most people cannot or do not want to grow rich in this fashion, they relish watching from the sidelines as a small section of their society does things by their own rules.

Like any other nation of the world, India There is a morbid fascination we associate with the darker shades of the society who are referred to as the 'underworld'.

Like any other nation of the world, India too has spawned its own version of the mafia. While the other states and locations have been the spokes, Mumbai has always been the hub.

Needless to say, the world's most notorious gangster: Dawood Ibrahim has been Mumbai's contribution. This book is a chronicle of how mafia grew and evolved into a corporate behemoth that at one point was a parallel governing system in itself. The storyline spans over 60 years and starts with the smaller knife-wielding pickpockets of yore and slowly paving the way for the big boys. Smuggling - whether it be gold,narcotics or imported goods was the golden corridor that made the fortunes of many a don in India.

Certain names which are household property in terms of current affairs are all given flesh and blood caricatures in the book. From these old stalwarts, the story moves to the blue eyed wonder boy named Dawood who gave the mafia a fresh new coat of paint. From gang and turf wars that left a trail of corpses behind, Dawood built a business conglomerate that would rival even the most advanced multinationals.

With affiliations,mergers and acquisitions the gang of erstwhile thugs grew into what was known as the D-company. Along the way, Dawood left India for safer haven in Dubai. The game shifts gears here for with intervention from intelligence agencies abroad the gang moves from strictly business deals to trying their hands in logistic support for terrorism.

The results of this have been two of the most devastating terror attacks that India has witnessed. The boy from Dongri who built a sprawling criminal empire had transfomed to something else entirely. This is what the book encompasses. It offers a bird's eye view of the counter culture that has deeply affected the moral fabric of India. For all the interesting subject material in the book, I did not find the author to be totally unbiased.

There was of course the starry eyed wonderment reserved for Dawood and this sometimes made the storyline a bit biased. Also, it is only towards the end of the book that any real importance is given to the policing system that finally brought the mafia to its knees. Until the final few chapters, they are pretty much sidelined.

The pace of the book however makes up for all this and if I were to tell you that the content of this book has already given rise to two movies, you would get the picture.

The impact mafia has on popular culture is rather immense. For instance, a movie named 'Nayagan' which was loosely inspired by the story of Varadarajan Muthaliar aka Vardha bhai has been hailed a masterpiece the World across.

It is one of the two movies from India chosen by Time as the World's best with the other being 'Pather Panchali'! A quick read and an above average one at that. Mar 31, Hyderali rated it it was amazing. Hussain Zaidi is master in detailing the life of underworld don Dawood Ibrahim.

Really, his hardwork of 6 years definitely made this book worth reading. I read S. I felt that every gangster portray in this book deserve a full 90mins of movie to be made on him. I'm really looking forward to his other books i.

Jul 29, Shipra Trivedi rated it really liked it. Dongri To Dubai is not just a book.

The book simply tells you the stories of local mafias and how they operated their networks with the help of some police officials, politicians, celebs and influenced personalities. The author has narrated very interesting stories of almost all the ganglords who indirectly ruled the economic center of India. As far as storyline is concerned, it is Dongri To Dubai is not just a book.

As far as storyline is concerned, it is divided into two parts so that readers can easily understand the difference between two eras. In the end, you just have to admire the efforts of author for doing so much extensive research on this topic, which is obviously not a cup of tea of any other journalist or storyteller.

It is fast paced and builds up an engaging read. Dongri To Dubai is recommended if you love the gangster bang-bangs, and feed your eyes mostly on Mafia diet. Mar 28, Gayatri Sriram rated it it was ok.

A book on the Mumbai Mafia was long overdue,I just wish it hadn't come from Mr. He might be the undisputed king of crime reporting, but a storyteller he is not. The timelines are awry, the characters are developed and scattered in a haphazard manner There are over fifty characters and hundreds are mentioned through the book, tiring to say the least when there is almost always nothing memorable about them.

The dialogues sound like some cheesy b grade movie, possibly due to the poor Hi A book on the Mumbai Mafia was long overdue,I just wish it hadn't come from Mr.

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The story does not progress in a fluid manner, but choppy and interrupted like a bunch of news clippings glued together. It is disappointing to say the least, because the meteoric rise of Dawood makes for stellar storytelling.

I guess with a story so good, you can rarely go wrong. But Mr. Zaidi gives it his best shot. I would still recommend this book, but only till something better comes along. Full marks for research, though. Dec 14, Vikas Singh rated it it was amazing Shelves: Written by India's ace crime reporter Hussain Zaidi, this is the first ever attempt to chronicle the birth and rise of Mumbai underworld.

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Combining his decades of experience in crime reporting with network of friends and contacts who gave him access to valuable documents, Zaidi creates a fast paced history of underworld. Never shy to mince words he does justice to all that happened in crime scene in Mumbai since Indian independence. One of the rare books on the subject, it is definitely a must r Written by India's ace crime reporter Hussain Zaidi, this is the first ever attempt to chronicle the birth and rise of Mumbai underworld.

One of the rare books on the subject, it is definitely a must read Sep 28, Poonam rated it really liked it. Growing up, I had read a great deal about Haji mastan and Jenabai in Mum's magazines, while closeted in a dark, secluded space. Book was a reminder of tid bits I had picked up then. Dongri to Dubai is his account of rise, growth and fall of underworld history in Mumbai from s. It covers the background and reign of Karim Lala, Haji Mastan, Varadrajan, explains the ever-changing alliances and rivalries of the underworld.

Pathan vs. One could easily create a family tree of each gang in Underworld. Hussain Zaidi has already written an accliamed 'Black Friday', further immortalised as eponymous movie.

However, Zaidi maintains that though Dawood funded blasts and funds fundamentalists groups against India in Pakistan, he is not a religious zealot, he is not even a practicising muslim. A startling but actually we have known before piece of info was two innocent, profitable business of Dawood brothers - one of home-grown Gutka helped to established in Pakistan by our own Mainkchand and Joshi businessmen and hndi film pirated CDs.

Money from these businesses are directly funded in jehadi activities against India. Sadaf and King's video are common pirated CDs sold in india, that are directly owned by D-company. So, our citizens in lieu of savinf few rupees for watching cinema actually fund terrorism, of which we ourselves are victims. Nice ploy. Book also mentions various policemen and IB officials who have achieved soemthing crucial time to time.

There are episodes of shootouts at Lokhandwala and Wadala involving Manya Surve , which too have been immortalised as movies. It does state in the murky business of crime, no one, either be police or gangster is straight and it is increasingly one-way street for a gangster. Writing is journalistic in style, that is storytelling backed by factual narration and book is very well-reasearched. I would recommend, anybody interested in history of crime in Bombay to pick this book for information.

Jan 04, Vijai rated it really liked it Shelves: This book has a major identity problem. On the outset, the book appears to only chronicle the infamous don's life story but then the author gets into this Mario Puzo style of recounting the entire yesteryear Mumbai mafia's transformation from one phase into another not to mention the feeble attempt to make you-know-who be given a Vito Corleone-ish shade. Seriously, the author t This book has a major identity problem. Seriously, the author talks about how a certain thug liked to spit on his madame and lick it, ugh.

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Notice the 'Godfather' connection? Also, one has to wonder, how did the author know?

Dongri to Dubai by Zaidi, Hussain - PDF Drive

Anyways, I am not going to deny the author his 4 stars not for the way he intended his readers would absorb it but for my own preferences. Allow me to elucidate. Have you ever been to a tea shop in a rural Indian village where there is always that one guy who knew everything about everyone and for a sponsored chai or beedi was willing to make your tea break interesting with some latest village gossip?

That is how I pictured Mr. Hussain Zaidi while going through this book. Excellent narrative style, a not-so-stellar but good enough research work and good proof reading provides for decent quality content.

Total time-pass book. Mar 21, Tanika rated it it was amazing. The book starts with a telephonic conversation between a veteran crime journalist and the man himself, post which the plot becomes narrative. The latter half talks about life and love of Dawood which are intricately woven into a series of incidents which the journalist has very meti The book starts with a telephonic conversation between a veteran crime journalist and the man himself, post which the plot becomes narrative.

The latter half talks about life and love of Dawood which are intricately woven into a series of incidents which the journalist has very meticulously time-lined.

Among the sub-plots, sequential events and detailed accounts on the stalwarts of crime, the book also offers interesting trivia about the etymology of the commonly used words in Mumbai mafia, the basis of gang formation, and even naming the first history-sheeter in the Mumbai police records. A great insight into the labyrinth-al world of one of the most feared men in India - Dawood.

Sep 08, Aditya Shobhawat rated it it was amazing Shelves: Once I started reading the book, I had to finish it at the earliest before I could go back to my normal routine. It is a must read book for the readers interested to learn about the clandestine world of Mumbai mafia and boasts to be the most comprehensive account of Mumbai underworld portrayed till date. Author truly deserves kudos for depicting the real life events of ghastly gangsters in a mode of story-telling.

However, reader is sometimes left with the sense of reading something 'filmy' in whi Once I started reading the book, I had to finish it at the earliest before I could go back to my normal routine. However, reader is sometimes left with the sense of reading something 'filmy' in which author has knowingly or unknowingly lionized the criminals.